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Have you been looking for a UTV windshield? Are you confused with all the choices - full, half, tilting, folding, vented, flexible? What material should a UTV windshield be made from, Lexan, acrylic, polycarbonate -what does it all mean? Read on as we explain the different types of UTV windshield materials and functions to help you decide which style is best for you.


First things first, what is the best windshield material? There are many options available including acrylic, polycarbonate, Plexiglas, even actual glass … but which is the best? Glass such as the automotive industry uses would be the best, as it offers the cleanest vision and easiest maintenance, but the drawback is expense and weight. The next best choice for windshield material is Lexan polycarbonate. Lexan is light weight, strong and has a proven track record of durability in high vibration applications, as well as superior impact resistance as it is used in Nascar. Other less expensive choices include Acrylics, Plexiglas and thinner polycarbonates, but these products easily scratch and may shatter upon impact-not a desirable trait when on the trail. These materials are more brittle and have been known to crack at the mounting points, so many of these types of shields must be removed for trailering. Easily scratched, these products are much more difficult to clean, as you must take extreme care as not to scratch or swirl the windshield surface. You may have seen such an a windshield on a UTV that has become so scratched and hazy that it cannot even be seen through.
 

Now that we know that Lexan is the material of choice for UTV windshield applications, the next choice is the material’s thickness. Kolpin UTV windshields are constructed of a full .250” (1/4”) Lexan while many other UTV windshield options use a thinner .177” (3/16”) material. The thicker material provides more stability, less vibration and better protection from damaging branches and rocks. Preparation of Lexan is critical for maximum durability, and Kolpin’s UTV windshields use an MR-10 hard coating on both sides of the shield for protection and scratch resistance. The coating makes cleaning much easier without fear of damage.
 

Now that we have defined the best material for a UTV windshield, let’s take a look at the many styles of Lexan polycarbonate UTV windshields available from Kolpin.



Full-Vented Windshield – definition: Extends from top of dash/hood to the top of the cab frame, with included air vents to provide additional airflow

* Back draft is present with all windshield applications, but is intensified when a full shield is used. A rear shield is suggested to reduce back draft.

Pros -
• Protection in colder weather and plowing conditions
• Best protection from limbs, branches, debris on the trail
• Venting regulates air flow and back draft effect
• All benefits of a Full Windshield with more airflow
• Inexpensive and easy to install
• No need to removed for trailering
 

Cons -
• May retain too much in cab heat in warm temperatures.
• Visibility may be a problem in muddy conditions.


Half-Fixed Windshield – definition: Extends from top of dash/hood ¼ - ½ the distance to the top of cab frame

 

#1470 Yamaha Rhino Half-Fixed Windshield

 

Pros -
• Provides more air flow , great for warm weather riding
• Lip on upper side of shield deflects airflow over operator and passenger
• Increased airflow reduces back draft for less dust in the cab
• Better visibility in mud, rain, or snow
• No need to remove during trailering
 

Cons -
• Less protection from wind, branches or flying debris.
• Cold in winter weather
• No adjustability


Half-Folding Windshield – definition: Extends from top of dash/hood to ¼ to ½ the distance to the top of the cab frame with convenient fold down, military-style design

 #2632 Polaris Ranger (mid-size & mid-size crew) Half-Folding Windshield

 

Pros -
• Provides more air flow which may be cooler in warm weather
• Versatile system allows you to simply lower the top half of shield on a warm day for maximum airflow. The upper shield stays securely in place – no tools needed
• Lip on upper side of shield deflects airflow over operator and passenger
• Increased airflow reduces back draft for less dust in the cab.
• Better visibility in mud, rain, or snow
• No need to remove for trailering
 

Cons –
• Less protection from wind, branches and debris than a full shield
• More moving parts, installation time is greater than a half-fixed shield


Full Tilting Windshield – definition: Versatile design allows for use as full windshield, half windshield, or extended (half or full) – it is like having 3 windshields in one!

 

#2621 Polaris Ranger XP (full size and Crew) Full Tilt Windshield

* Back draft is present with all windshield applications, but is intensified when a full shield is used. A rear shield is suggested to reduce back draft.

Pros -
• Can be utilized as full or half windshield
• Top section can be tilted to regulate air flow and back draft
• Either section can be easily removed.
• Offers the most options over the broadest range of conditions.
 

Cons -
• Slightly more expensive than standard windshield design


Rear Shield or Back Panel Combo – definition: Effective barrier to keep debris from entering the cab, as well as safely separating passengers and cargo

 

#2009 Polaris RZR Rear Shield            Rear Shield with full windshield

 

Pros -
• Cuts down on backdraft caused by windshield and reduces chance of dirt/debris entering the cab
• Safely separates cargo loads from passengers
 

Cons -
• Does not allow easy attachment of accessories to the rear cab frame, such as the Kolpin Utility Gear Rail System


Kolpin offers a many styles of windshields to fit the most popular models such as the Polaris Ranger, Polaris RZR, Yamaha Rhino, Kawasaki Teryx, Kawasaki Mule, Arctic Cat Prowler, John Deere Gator, Can Am Commander and more! Visit www.kolpin.com or call Kolpin at 877.9KOLPIN for more information.

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  • Guest (Bill Crawfod)

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    Have been looking at your Dix-C drive in x-change All season Plow -- question - will it fit a UTV 2006 Bobcat 2200S. -- Bill